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Reworking authority : leading and following in the post-modern organization / Larry Hirschhorn.

By: Hirschhorn, Larry.
Material type: materialTypeLabelBookSeries: Organization studies (cambridge, mass.): Publisher: [S.l.] : The MIT Press, 1997Edition: 1st Edition. ed.Description: 132 p. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 0262082586; 9780262082587.Subject(s): Management Techniques | Leadership In Business | Organization Development | Management & management techniques | Occupational & industrial psychology | Organizational theory & behaviour | Psychology | Business & Economics | Leadership | Organizational change | Business & Economics / Management | General | Management | Management - General | Political Science / General | Structural Adjustment | Corporate culture | Delegation of authorityDDC classification: 658.406 Online resources: Amazon.com | Amazon customer reviews Summary: "In Reworking Authority , Larry Hirschhorn incisively describes the changing dynamics and difficulties of contemporary organizations. His approach to consulting with troubled groups, addressing the needs and fears of personnel at all levels in the hierarchy, is sensitive and sophisticated. This book will fascinate and inform anyone with an interest in the way organizations, or the people who work in them, function in our post-modern age." -- Jay Greenberg, Editor, Contemporary Psychoanalysis For many companies, the past decade has been marked by a sense of turbulence and redefinition. The growing role of information technologies and service businesses has prompted companies to reconsider how they are structured and even what business they are in. These changes have also affected how people work, what skills they need, and what kind of careers they expect. One critical change in how people work, argues Larry Hirschhorn, is that they are expected to bring more of themselves psychologically to the job. To facilitate this change, it is necessary to create a new culture of authority--one in which superiors acknowledge their dependence on subordinates, subordinates can challenge superiors, and both are able to show their vulnerability. In the old culture of authority, people suppressed disruptive feelings such as envy, resentment, and fear of dependency. But by depersonalizing themselves, they became "alienated"; in the process, the work of the organization suffered. In building a new culture of authority, we are challenged to express these feelings without disrupting our work. We learn how to bring our feelings to our tasks. The first chapters of the book examine the covert processes by which people caught between the old and new culture of authority neither suppress nor express their feelings. Feelings are activated but not directed toward useful work. The case studies of this process are instructive and moving. The book then explores how organizations can create a culture of openness in which people become more psychologically present. In part, the process entails an understanding of the changes taking place in how we experience our own identity at work and that of "others" in society at large. To do this, the book suggests, we need a social policy of forgiveness and second chances.
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Copy number Status Date due Barcode
Books The MUA Library South C campus
- Open Collection
STACK 2 HD 57.7 .H57 1997 (Browse shelf) 1 Available 2008-2869

Hardcover.

"In Reworking Authority , Larry Hirschhorn incisively describes the changing dynamics and difficulties of contemporary organizations. His approach to consulting with troubled groups, addressing the needs and fears of personnel at all levels in the hierarchy, is sensitive and sophisticated. This book will fascinate and inform anyone with an interest in the way organizations, or the people who work in them, function in our post-modern age." -- Jay Greenberg, Editor, Contemporary Psychoanalysis For many companies, the past decade has been marked by a sense of turbulence and redefinition. The growing role of information technologies and service businesses has prompted companies to reconsider how they are structured and even what business they are in. These changes have also affected how people work, what skills they need, and what kind of careers they expect. One critical change in how people work, argues Larry Hirschhorn, is that they are expected to bring more of themselves psychologically to the job. To facilitate this change, it is necessary to create a new culture of authority--one in which superiors acknowledge their dependence on subordinates, subordinates can challenge superiors, and both are able to show their vulnerability. In the old culture of authority, people suppressed disruptive feelings such as envy, resentment, and fear of dependency. But by depersonalizing themselves, they became "alienated"; in the process, the work of the organization suffered. In building a new culture of authority, we are challenged to express these feelings without disrupting our work. We learn how to bring our feelings to our tasks. The first chapters of the book examine the covert processes by which people caught between the old and new culture of authority neither suppress nor express their feelings. Feelings are activated but not directed toward useful work. The case studies of this process are instructive and moving. The book then explores how organizations can create a culture of openness in which people become more psychologically present. In part, the process entails an understanding of the changes taking place in how we experience our own identity at work and that of "others" in society at large. To do this, the book suggests, we need a social policy of forgiveness and second chances.

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